Monday, July 25, 2011

Mortimer Adler's How to Read A Book

My wife unknowingly downloaded Mortimer Adler's book How to Read a Book without knowing that Adler was a philosopher. In the future, I want to incorporate this book into Introductory courses, yet I wondered if anyone has ever required an audible text for their students?

In addition, I just wondered if anyone had devoted about 4-5 weeks to a how-to skills portion in their introductory courses?

Last time, I taught Intro to Philosophy, I used Lewis Vaughn's book on how to write philosophy for two weeks.

5 comments:

Max Weismann said...

We are a not-for-profit educational organization, founded by Mortimer Adler and we have recently made an exciting discovery--three years after writing the wonderfully expanded third edition of How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren made a series of thirteen 14-minute videos--lively discussing the art of reading. The videos were produced by Encyclopaedia Britannica. For reasons unknown, sometime after their original publication, these videos were lost.

Three hours with Mortimer Adler on one DVD. A must for libraries and classroom teaching the art of reading.

I cannot exaggerate how instructive these programs are--we are so sure that you will agree, if you are not completely satisfied, we will refund your donation.

Please go here to see a clip and learn more:

http://www.thegreatideas.org/HowToReadABook.htm

ISBN: 978-1-61535-311-8

Thank you,

Max Weismann

Max Weismann said...

We are a not-for-profit educational organization, founded by Mortimer Adler and we have recently made an exciting discovery--three years after writing the wonderfully expanded third edition of How to Read a Book, Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren made a series of thirteen 14-minute videos--lively discussing the art of reading. The videos were produced by Encyclopaedia Britannica. For reasons unknown, sometime after their original publication, these videos were lost.

Three hours with Mortimer Adler on one DVD. A must for libraries and classroom teaching the art of reading.

I cannot exaggerate how instructive these programs are--we are so sure that you will agree, if you are not completely satisfied, we will refund your donation.

Please go here to see a clip and learn more:

http://www.thegreatideas.org/HowToReadABook.htm

ISBN: 978-1-61535-311-8

Thank you,

Max Weismann

Carbondale Chasmite said...

Max,

Usually, I don't post solicitation on my blog, but this information is pertinent since many philosophers and graduate students often visit here. These same individuals might teach a foundational course or be designing their own introductory courses. I've flirted with the idea of possibly writing down and outlining the book and forcing students to read how to read. I'd even devote time someday to making a workbook with this book. That's how much I am in love with this book for first-year pedagogy and university teaching in general.

Deb said...

This may be a good resource for your 1st yr. students:

http://pne.people.si.umich.edu/PDF/howtoread.pdf

Also, in doing my Master's thesis I came across 'The Craft of Research,' a book I wished someone had introduced me to at the beginning of my Master's work.

Carbondale Chasmite said...

Deb,

Thank you. I attended several English Composition and Rhetoric sessions once and as a philosopher I was acutely aware of the difficulties they faced in teaching writing. No mention, however, of reading is ever taught. Reading is secondary. It's something the students are supposed to do already, but I'm afraid these skills are being lost. This is definitely one area philosophy is poised to help. I like how the Edwards' sheet comes with some attention paid to background considerations. Somehow, I want to incorporate Gadamerian insights into pedagogy.

By the way, in the same conference, it was admitted that all pedagogy is theft. I tend to agree.